Why Is The Number 69 Shirt Banned In The NBA?

The number 69 has never appeared on the back of any player in the history of the American Professional Basketball League (NBA).

Throughout the history of more than 70 years, the NBA has been through generations of players, but no one wears the number 69 shirt. Many rumors are woven when talking about the number 69 from feng shui elements, unlucky to sensitive meaning.

The NBA has never confirmed or issued a law banning players from choosing a number 69. However, the tournament once prevented a player from choosing the number 69. That person is a basketball legend, Dennis Rodman.

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The number 69 is rejected by the NBA

In his final NBA season, Rodman decided to join the Dallas Mavericks. The 6-time NBA champion initially chose the number 69. Even Mavericks president Mark Cuban had some of Rodman’s 69-printed shirts on and kept until today.

“Rodman asked to wear the number 69 when he joined the Mavericks. They even printed a few shirts and Mark Cuban still stored. At that time, billionaire Mark Cuban had just reached an agreement to buy back the Mavericks, but not yet completed. legal procedures to become a new owner, “said Marc Stein of the New York Times.

Rodman was then not allowed to wear the number 69. NBA president David Stern then refused to let the number 69 appear for the first time in history. “The NBA rejected the number 69. Rodman decided to choose the number 70. 69 + 1,” added journalist Marc Stein of the New York Times.

Rodman changed his shirt number to 70
Rodman changed his shirt number to 70

The reason given by David Stern is “related to basketball.” If David Stern had a reason to stop Chris Paul from joining the Lakers, then refusing Rodman to use the number 69 would not be clear. NBA or David Stern never explained why Rodman was not allowed to use the number 69 in the last season of his career.

However, Metta World Peace is luckier than Rodman when allowed to use the number 96 in the 2008/09 season at the Houston Rockets. The number 96 also appeared in a season when Metta World Peace then moved to the Lakers.

Unwritten Law

Many have compared NCAA’s shirt selection rules (student-level basketball tournament system in the US) to explain this. NCAA players must not use 6, 7, 8, and 9 tail numbers in dozens. This is a rule that college basketball players in America have to follow for many years.

In contrast to the NBA, the NCAA has specific rules regarding the use of jerseys.
In contrast to the NBA, the NCAA has specific rules regarding the use of jerseys.

Specifically, the numbers that are counted as valid include 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 00, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 30 , 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54 and 55. In addition, a team is not allowed to own the same number of shirts 0 and 00. This makes the numbers from 6 to 9, 16 to 19, 26 to 29, 36 to 39, 46 to 49, and greater than 55 never appear in the NCAA. According to the New York Times, the NCAA has adhered to this number selection principle since the 1960s.

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This partly explains that the number of shirts 69 has never appeared in NBA history. Professional basketball players usually keep the same number of shirts they chose when they were young. There are very few cases of changing the shirt number. Having to adhere to the shirt selection rules from the NCAA level seems to impact the NBA.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the NBA has very few players who choose a number of shirts with numbers between 6 and 9. Although the NBA is not too strict and the players are chosen from 0 to 99.

Interference with the hand gesture of the referee

Another explanation is that the number of shirts involved in the referee’s hand gesture operation when blaming the player. NBA rules in particular and basketball, in general, require that the referees must use both hands to announce the offender’s shirt number. The use of players with a tail number of 6, 7, 8, and 9 in dozens will make it difficult for the referee team to report an error.

This explanation is less convincing when many NBA players are using the number of tails including 6, 7, 8, and 9 in dozens. Even 2 players Jae Crowder and Tacko Fall used the number 99.

The use of players with a tail number of 6, 7, 8, and 9 in dozens will make it difficult for the referee team to report an error.
The use of players with a tail number of 6, 7, 8, and 9 in dozens will make it difficult for the referee team to report an error.

From the above explanations, the number 69 why not appear in the NBA is still a big mystery. Although the number 69 has never appeared on NBA courts, it has always attracted fans’ curiosity and curiosity.